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Home » News

First Baby Born at UCSF in 2012.

Article / Review by on January 3, 2012 – 8:30 pmNo Comments

First Baby Born at UCSF in 2012

Luis Gutierrez, 30, and fiance Eveth Martinez, 27, pose with their newborn son Joey, who was the first baby born at UCSF in 2012.Luis Gutierrez, 30, and fiance Eveth Martinez, 27, pose with their newborn son Joey, who was the first baby born at UCSF in 2012.

Joey Santino Gutierrez was supposed to be a Christmas baby, or so his parents thought. Due on December 24, his mother Eveth Martinez, 27, spent Christmas eve and Christmas day anxiously awaiting the arrival of her second son.

Instead, Joey kicked off 2012 for his parents and UCSF, as the first baby born at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in 2012. Born at 7:43 a.m. on Jan. 1, 2012, Joey weighed in at 7 pounds, 15 ounces, a healthy baby boy. Martinez was among seven women in labor on New Year’s Eve, but Joey was the first to make his debut at UCSF. The first baby born in San Francisco was delivered at California Pacific Medical Center at 12:02 a.m.

 

Registered nurse Janelle Stein feeds a bottle to Joey Gutierrez at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital.

Registered nurse Janelle Stein feeds a bottle to Joey Gutierrez at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital.

Martinez and fiancé Luis Gutierrez live in San Francisco’s Mission District with their seven-year-old son. And will they try for a girl? “Not for a long time!” said Martinez, just five hours after giving birth. “We’re going to space them out.”

Martinez was originally a patient at St. Luke’s Hospital, however because she suffers from epileptic seizures, she was transferred to UCSF to have access to world-renowned specialists in neurology.

Joey is the first of about 2,000 babies who will be born at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital this year. Starting in 2015, those babies will be born at UCSF’s new 289-bed children’s, women’s, and cancer hospital in Mission Bay – which will offer a 36-bed center for mothers and newborns, including nine deluxe labor and delivery rooms.

UCSF has not had the first San Francisco baby born in the new year since 2007, when it happened for the first time in nearly a quarter of a century.

Pediatric resident Alison Kuchta, MD, PhD, performed routine tests for newborns on 6-hour-old Joey Gutierrez.Pediatric resident Alison Kuchta, MD, PhD, performed routine tests for newborns on 6-hour-old Joey Gutierrez.

Photos by Susan Merrell

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About UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital creates an environment where children and their families find compassionate care at the forefront of scientific discovery, with more than 150 experts in 50 medical specialties serving patients throughout Northern California and beyond. The hospital admits about 5,000 children each year, including 2,000 babies born in the UCSF Medical Center. For more information, go here.

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> About University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care. It is the only UC campus in the 10-campus system dedicated exclusively to the health sciences.

More about University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

More about University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Information.

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*  The above story is adapted from materials provided by University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

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