General Health

General health issues, Medical conditions, Research and studies and more

Mental Health

Natural Medicine

Nutritional supplements, Herbs, Alternative medicine and more…

Wellness & Lifestyle

Nutrition, Diets, Healthy living, Detox, Exercise and Physical Fitness, Sports Fitness and more…

Women’s Health

Relationships, Pregnancy, Birth control, Menopause and more

Home » Information, News

UNICEF calls for urgent funding for nutrition crisis in DPR Korea

Article / Review by on November 1, 2011 – 8:40 pmNo Comments

UNICEF calls for urgent funding for nutrition crisis in DPR Korea

1 November 2011

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) today called for funding to assist millions of people in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), particularly children and women, who are at risk of becoming severely malnourished.
Mother and child at a UN-supported paediatric hospital in the Democratic People’s Republic of KoreaMother and child at a UN-supported paediatric hospital in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

“If the funding does not arrive and we are unable to keep up our nutrition programmes to treat those children who are severely malnourished, these children will suffer irreversible consequences on their growth and development capacity,” said Bijaya Rajbhandari, UNICEF Representative in DPRK.

The agency, which has been working in DPRK for over 25 years, has requested $20.4 million for its emergency response for this year but has only received $4.6 million, it stated in a news release. Other agencies working in the country are facing similar funding shortfalls.

“We must continue to address the poor public nutrition situation in DPRK in combination with adequate health, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions which are also underlying factors to the malnutrition situation in DPRK,” said Mr. Rajbhandari.

According to UNICEF reports, maternal under-nutrition is of great concern, as over a quarter of women in DPRK aged 15 to 49 are under-nourished.

This puts them at greater risk of delivering infants with low birth weight who are at higher risk of mortality and diseases, increasing widespread chronic malnutrition with catastrophic long-term effects on children’s development.

During her recent visit to the DPRK, UN humanitarian chief Valerie Amos warned that the country cannot feed its people for the “foreseeable future,” and urged the world to step up its humanitarian support for an estimated six million people who now depend on food aid.

Ms. Amos, the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and UN Emergency Relief Coordinator, reported that the country remains “highly food insecure,” with daily rations recently reduced, unreliable food supplies, restricted agricultural production and many children left stunted.

###

UNICEF calls for funding to prevent nutrition crisis in DPRK, especially among children

GENEVA, 1 November 2011 –

UNICEF today called on the international community to fund its nutrition programme in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea for millions of vulnerable people, especially malnourished children and pregnant and nursing women.  For 2011, UNICEF has asked for $20.4 million for emergency response but has received only $4.6 million. Other agencies working in DPRK are facing similar funding shortfalls.

“If the funding does not arrive and we are unable to keep up our nutrition programmes to treat those children who are severely malnourished, these children will suffer irreversible consequences on their growth and development capacity,” said Bijaya Rajbhandari, UNICEF Representative in DPRK. “There are also thousands of moderately malnourished children who are in danger of becoming severely malnourished without either family or the state able to care for them,”

“We must continue to address the poor public nutrition situation in DPRK in combination with adequate health, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions which are also underlying factors to the malnutrition situation in DPRK,” he added.

According to UNICEF reports, maternal under-nutrition is of great concern, as over a quarter of women in DPRK aged 15 to 49 are under-nourished. This greatly increases their risk of delivering infants with low birth weight who are at higher risk of mortality and diseases, increasing widespread chronic malnutrition with catastrophic long term effects on children’s development.

“DPRK has been in a vicious cycle where the general population’s chronic malnutrition has been unchanged for a long period of time.” said Mr. Rajbhandari. “Should no sustainable action be taken, children in DPRK will never realize their full potential.”

UNICEF has been working in DPRK since 1985. UNICEF supports the child health, maternal health, nutrition, water, sanitation, hygiene and education programme both as a regular programme and emergency programme.

###

> About UNICEF

UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence.  The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS.  UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

###

> About United Nations (UN).

The General Assembly in session. Photo credit: UN / Eskinder Debebe The United Nations was established on 24 October 1945 by 51 countries committed to preserving peace through international cooperation and collective security. Today, nearly every nation in the world belongs to the UN: membership totals 192 countries.

When States become Members of the United Nations, they agree to accept the obligations of the UN Charter, an international treaty that sets out basic principles of international relations. According to the Charter, the UN has four purposes:

  • to maintain international peace and security;
  • to develop friendly relations among nations;
  • to cooperate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights;
  • and to be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

###

* The above story is adapted from materials provided by United Nations (UN)
** More information at United Nations (UN)

More about United Nations (UN)

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.